Common, but Unknown- Day 6 of 7 Day Trichster

I’m amazed at the amount of outreach, of sharing, and the courage of those who have come out of hiding since I began this journey six days ago. Those who’ve reach out, those who I was unaware suffered as I do. I’m not alone, as others aren’t either, we’re just…

HIDING.

I question why?

There’s support for the mental health movement, as a society we are moving towards being more open. It’s not perfect, we have a long way to go. Yet awareness for most afflictions is growing, and daily I see posts on my Facebook about self-care, and even many speaking out about their own mental health struggles. It makes my heart happy, but it also makes my belly burn with fire. So many live with Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviours, “2-5% of the Canadian population, or approximately 2 million adults and children” according to the CBSN. That is not a small number. Yet still most Canadians, mental health advocates, and even physicians have no clue what BFRBs are.

I’ve seen three psychologists since being diagnosed with Trichotillomania. Two of them have called what I have “a habit”, suggesting I simply “stop it” and fiddle with my hands instead.  One recognized my struggle, researched the disorder, and openly admitted she had no idea how to help. This. Is. Not. Okay.

One factor is awareness. The second is the way BFRBs are portrayed in media and popular culture.

Trichotillomania has been featured on ABCs 20/20 My Strange Affliction more than once. Featured along with those who love carpets, and a life-time witch who is afraid of water. Also seen on TLC’s My Strange Addiction Trichophagia, Dermatillomania and Trichotillomania have been featured as recent as last year. A show famous for displaying the oddities and lifestyles of those who suffer from addictions of all kinds, yet BFRBs are not an addiction? BFRBs are a mental illness. Finally, it seems BFRBs have been featured by Ripley’s Believe It Or Not.

Its no wonder those with BFRBs feel the need to hide!?

The culture that surrounds us is labelling us as odd, weird and unbelievable. If someone with another more well-known mental illness were to featured in such a way I find it hard to believe there wouldn’t be some sort of uproar.

BFRBs affect a significant proportion of Canadians from youth to adults. BFRBs hurt families, inhibit the ability of some to succeed, but mostly damage confidence and self-worth of all affected. It’s time those who are affected start to feel represented. The only way to do this is through speaking up, and sharing information about BFRBs.

Let’s Connect! My goal in this blog is to create a community, help others and in turn grow myself. This is not just about sharing my story, but those of others- Want to collaborate? Suggest a post? Ask a question? Meet to chat? I’m all ears! Send me an email, instagram or via @AnaSmallwood

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